ISB News

Genetic Switch May Help Marine Microalgae Respond to Higher CO2 Levels

3 Bullets Rapid climate change, including ocean acidification caused by increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, is predicted to affect the oceans, sea life, and the global carbon cycle. Marine microalgae, including diatoms, are responsible for converting CO2 into oxygen and biologically usable carbon through photosynthesis. How these organisms will respond over the short and long term to rising CO2 is unknown. Growth experiments and transcriptomic analyses performed by UW and…

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Symposium on “Taoism, Biology & Life” at ISB on May 18, 2015

Painting copyright Feng Xiaodong. Institute for Systems Biology presents: Taoism, Biology and Life Please join ISB in welcoming Xiao Dong Feng and Dr. Stephen Little for a symposium on Taoism, Biology and Life. Opening remarks by Dr. Lee Hood. This event is free and open to the public. Location: ISB Main Floor, 401 Terry Ave N, Seattle Date: Monday, May 18 Time: 3:15pm – 5pm Biographies: Xiao Dong Feng was…

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The Most Powerful Tool for Reconstructing a Gene Network

Scanning EM of bacteria being eaten by white blood cell Photo Credit: Adrian Ozinsky 3 Bullets: Nearly a decade ago, ISB’s Baliga Lab published a landmark paper describing cMonkey, an innovative method to accurately map gene networks within any organism from microbes to humans. Two new papers describe the benchmark results of cMonkey and also the release of cMonkey2, which performs with higher accuracy. Using this approach, genetic and molecular…

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For the first time in the U.S.: Join ISB for BIO-FICTION

Join us on Thursday, May 7 at Institute for Systems Biology 
in South Lake Union Doors open at 4:30pm. Screening begins at 5:00pm, followed by a panel discussion. BIO·FICTION explores the emerging field of synthetic biology from different disciplinary angles including science and engineering, social science, cultural studies, amateur biology, film making, art and design. The original program had presentations, panel discussions, do-it-yourself biology demos, performances, art works and, of…

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GiveBIG 2015

Date: Tuesday, May 5th, 2015 Time: 12:00 AM to 12:00 AM PST Where: The Seattle Foundation website Get Involved: Visit ISB’s profile page GiveBIG is an annual, community-wide day of giving hosted by The Seattle Foundation that aims to inspire regional philanthropy. Between midnight and midnight (PST) on May 5th, The Seattle Foundation and its generous sponsors will match a percentage of all contributions to local nonprofits. If you are…

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NIH-Led Effort – Including ISB – Launches Big Data Portal for Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery

The National Institutes of Health announced the launch of a new Alzheimer’s Big Data portal, which includes the first wave of data for use by the research community. This portal is the result of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) program, which focuses on facilitating collaboration among government agencies, academia and industry in order to translate research more quickly to therapies. The launch of the AMP Alzeheimers Disease Knowledge Portal is…

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ISB and P&G researchers identify markers of healthy skin development

3 Bullets: The barrier function of skin is integral to personal well-being and is associated with several widespread diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. ISB and Procter & Gamble researchers used human skin grown in the lab to measure changes in protein levels as the skin matures. The results of this study provide many new markers for healthy skin development. By Dr. Kristian Swearingen and Dr. Jason Winget In a…

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Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, center, chats with two of his staff members, left, and, at right, Dr. Nitin Baliga and Dr. Dana Riley Black, both of Institute for Systems Biology, Institute for Systems Biology/March 16, 2015

Gov. Inslee Hosts Round Table With College Students at ISB

Gov. Jay Inslee hosted a round table discussion today at Institute for Systems Biology with a group of invited college students, who were asked to share their thoughts on the affordability of education. We were honored to be able to provide the venue. ISB has had a long history of supporting systemic change at the K-12 school district level to improve the quality and access of STEM education. Now, our…

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Researchers Find Key Protein Tied to Production of ‘Good’ Cholesterol

3 Bullets: Inflammation causes cholesterol buildup and leads to cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the world ISB, Seattle Biomed, and Oregon State University researchers collaborate to identify a compendium of proteins that control expression of a key regulator of cholesterol efflux Targeting cholesterol efflux to HDL is a potentially important therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating cardiovascular disease By Dr. Mark Gillespie Cells of the immune system,…

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Baliga Lab: ‘The Universe Under a Microscope’

This is an excerpt from Environmental Microbiology Reports, 2015, authored by Arjun Raman, a postdoc in the Baliga Lab here at Institute for Systems Biology. The beauty of a living thing is not the atoms that go into it, but the way those atoms are put together. Information distilled over four billion years of biological evolution. Incidentally, all the organisms on the Earth are made essentially of that stuff. An…

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Tuberculosis Research: A ‘Molecular Road Map’ to Help Understand Gene Regulation

The journal “Trends in Microbiology” recently published a spotlight article on a tuberculosis research collaboration between scientists at Institute for Systems Biology and Seattle BioMed. The paper “The DNA-binding network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis” was published in the journal “Nature Communications” (Jan. 12, 2015): “MTB employs about 200 different molecular switches to sense and respond to the shifting, hostile landscape of the host. To identify and understand the intertwining gene regulatory…

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A breakthrough in understanding the genetic ‘architecture’ of bipolar disorder

3 Bullets: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common, severe and recurrent psychiatric disorder with no known cure and substantial morbidity and mortality. Heritable causes contribute up to 80 percent of lifetime risk for BD. Scientists hope that identifying the specific genes involved in risk for bipolar disorder will lead to new ways to treat the disease. ISB researchers identified contributions of rare variants to BD by sequencing the genomes of…

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ISB Gets $1.7M to Study Cancer Drug Resistance

Congratulations to the Sui Huang Lab at ISB which has received a five-year $1.7 million R01 award from the National Institutes of Health and National Institute for General Medical Sciences to study cancer sub-population dynamics to understand and develop drugs to inhibit lethal cancer-drug resistance. The project proposal states that the work will: “develop a quantitative and formal framework for describing the temporal evolution of cell phenotype distribution in a…

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Tuberculosis: ‘The Forgotten Plague’

PBS: American Experience Film “The Forgotten Plague” BY ISBUSA The measles outbreak and subsequent fueling of the anti-vaccination debate have monopolized headlines recently. But there’s a “plague” that causes an estimated 1.3 million deaths per year that researchers, including those at Institute for Systems Biology, are dedicated to tackling: tuberculosis. On Tuesday, Feb. 10, PBS will feature an “American Experience” film “The Forgotten Plague” on the history of tuberculosis and…

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ISB Releases Kaviar, World’s Largest Public Catalog of Human Genomic Variation

3 Bullets: Kaviar is ISB’s comprehensive catalog of human genomic variation Kaviar combines 31 data sources for a total of 151 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs), covering 5% of all the positions in the human genome A researcher studying possible disease-causing variants can use Kaviar to answer the question, “Have these variants been observed before, and if so, how often?” By Terry Farrah A typical pair of human genomes are…

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Into the genetic weeds of hair growth

3 Bullets: ISB researchers used a data-driven mathematical model to identify specific genes associated with hair regeneration Novel methodology paves way for continued research into the molecular basis of this complex cycle as well as other regenerative organs like skin and liver Findings may lead to more precise targets for therapies and genetic markers of hair wellness By Varsha Dhankani Scientists at ISB have identified genes associated with the growth-and-death…

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Pushing the Molecular Switches of Tuberculosis Into Overdrive to Map Interactions

3 Bullets: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infects more than 1.5 billion people worldwide partly due to its ability to sense and adapt to the broad range of hostile environments that exist within hosts. To study how MTB controls its responses at a molecular level, ISB researchers and their collaborators at Seattle Biomed perturbed almost all MTB transcription factor regulators and identified the affected genes. This comprehensive map of molecular switches in…

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ISB’s 100K Project A Top Story on GenomeWeb

By ISBUSA GenomeWeb announces 2014’s top-10 most-read articles on personalized medicine and the article on ISB’s 100K Wellness Project was No. 1. Here’s an excerpt from GenomeWeb’s Jan. 5 story: NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – GenomeWeb readers in 2014 were most interested in a story about a large study investigating why some people remain healthy while others get sick. The top article was about healthcare entrepreneur Leroy Hood’s efforts to advance…

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